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Candida Question #55 Is Fishy Smell Associated With Yeast Infection?

Not really. You shouldn’t have a fish briny sort of vaginal sort of smell with a yeast infection. A yeast infection smell is more of a musty sort of smell. It can be a cheesy discharge and a lot of itch.

When I think of a fish smell, I’m thinking more about bacterial vaginosis, which tends to have a different type of watery, profuse, gray sort of discharge with that fish brine smell. So you should not really have a fishy smell with a Candida infection. But you can have a strong odor, though, which may be misconstrued as a fish smell, but not really. So I hope that answers your question.

My book explains quite a lot about this whole thing, and in Chapter 3, you can read about the diagnosing, testing, and identifying of yeast infections. There’s a whole section on the different types of vaginal afflictions, including inflammations and conditions affecting the vagina. You can read all about those, Chlamydia, Gonorrhea, Herpes, Candida, Bacterial Vaginosis, and I explain all the signs and symptoms, what you’re likely to experience, if there’s any discharge, the odor, what kind of itch you’re likely to get, it’s all in the book. So you can read a lot more about that in Candida Crusher.

Hope that answers your question. Thank you.

Candida Question #54 Can I Buy OTC AntiFungal Cream For Itch?

Of course you can. There are many different creams and lotions and potions you can use for yeast infection. My recommendations are for you not really to use the pharmaceutical approach where you’re going to use a vaginal applicator and a pharmaceutical cream. I don’t find women often have success with these products. They tend to get recurring thrush, recurring yeast infection, which require recurring applications. And often times, a doctor will prescribe these creams along with an applicator, along with an anti-fungal like fluconazole.

You can see some of my case histories in my book, Candida Crusher. Some of these women take these products for 2, 5, and 10 years or more and get no relief. And as soon as they stop, the problem keeps recurring.

What I think about in my mind when you use a product and a proper protocol, you should get a resolution from your problem. You shouldn’t have to be continually relying on a product to keep a problem not just at bay but to eradicate it. If you need to keep using these creams, there’s something not right here. You’re not doing something right.

Have a look at my book, Candida Crusher, Chapter 5, Chronic Vaginal Yeast Infections. There’s some brilliant ideas in there to show you how you can actually cure this condition, get rid of it for good.

So, you can use over-the-counter creams, but why would you recurrently use a cream. Using a cream and getting rid of the condition short term is good, but relying on a product is no good. A good cream you could try out, for example, would be a tea tree-based cream. There are creams made with many different herbs and products with tea tree are very good products that you could use.

What about a tea tree suppository? I recommend those. You can read about those in my book. There are many different douche or cleansing protocols I’ve written about, particularly useful in conjunction with my Candida Crusher diet.

So give that some consideration rather than just relying continually on creams. Thank you.

Candida Question #52 Can I Pass Yeast Infection On To My Unborn Baby?

You can. Many children are born with varying types of conditions that the mother actually has. It’s not impossible to do that and caution needs to be taken. This is why it’s quite clever of you to try and clear any vaginal issues that you have in the second or third trimester, in particular, which will make it a lot easier for you.

Genital herpes is another concern that many doctors have of a woman passing an active herpes condition onto her baby if she has genital herpes. It is possible to pass this on to your unborn baby or I should say baby when it’s being born. If the baby’s still in utero, it’s not highly likely that the baby’s going to have a yeast infection from you. Although some people would argue that systemic infection can pass through the placenta into the child, but I’ve not really seen evidence of this.

Perhaps I didn’t’ answer that question properly, but when you give birth to a child and you have active vaginal thrush, there is a chance that you will pass it on. But if the baby’s in utero and has not been delivered yet, there’s probably a very slim risk of you passing that on because the baby’s in quite a safe environment.

So I do hope that answers your question. Thank you.