Your immune system response to candida

Thanks for checking out this great video today. I think you’re going to enjoy this video, particularly if you’ve been struggling with Candida for a long, long time.

Many people have this idea that if you change your diet and eat specific foods, you’re going to cure Candida. Other people have got this idea that if you take antifungals, just pop a few probiotics, antifungals; you’re going to cure Candida. Other people have this idea if you take one of these chitin inhibitors like Lufenuron; you’re going to cure Candida. Everyone has got their own take on curing Candida.

What a lot of people don’t look at are some of the major factors, underpinning reasons, why people continue on with Candida infections. Where they go from one infection to another or they relapse. They’ll partially get better, and then they’ll get sick again. I see this a lot with patients. Patients who come back to me even five or ten years after treatment and they’re still back in the Candida phase again. Why is this so? Why do some people get cured quickly and easily and other people five or ten years down the track still struggle with sickness? They’re just not getting well.

This video doesn’t just relate to Candida. You can actually draw parallels with this video with a whole raft of different types of conditions that affect people. Whether it’s heart disease, diabetes, any kind of autoimmune disease. The chief thing I want you to remember that keeps us alive is our immune system. A strong, viable, healthy immune system will keep us in a very good state. In my book, I wrote about this quite extensively about resistance, how we’ve become more susceptible to certain things and how we can become more resistant to things. So it’s basically a seesaw.

Let’s talk about the three key things underpinning the immune status, which are responsible for making us feel really well or feel really sick. One of the key things I want you to think about initially is your nutritional status. You all know about this in terms of our diet. Eating the right kind of foods. The right kind of foods are going to supply us, obviously, with the micronutrients that we require to feel well. We know about proteins in our diet, about carbohydrates, about fats, about vitamins, minerals, and all these nutritional contingent factors we need to build robust good health.

The smallest trace elements are critically important for our vitality and to keep us alive. The tiniest little things that we need in our diet, very small amounts of copper, selenium. It’s not just about the big macro elements like calcium and magnesium, but also the tiniest of elements. We might only need them in microgram amounts, but they’re crucial for survival.

I once saw a drawing of this huge big jumbo jet and there was a big arrow pointing towards the tiny rubber wheels saying without this rubber wheel on this massive big 360-ton aircraft, the plane’s going to go nowhere. It’s not going to be able to take off or land. And even though that rubber makes up a tiny amount of that aircraft, it’s crucial for passenger’s safety, just like a tiny bit of a trace element that’s in your diet is crucial for your well-being. It’s not all about the big wings and the body. It’s also about the tiniest elements that we need in small amounts.

These can be often hard to get from the diet. That’s why it’s important for us to eat a wide variety of high quality organic fruits and vegetables. I prefer to grow all my own vegetables these days, and I find the taste is incomparable. If you’ve got any garden space and you can grow something like spinach or kale or broccoli, it’s very worthwhile doing that. It’s a great exercise. It’s something I highly encourage you to do. Also some clean meats, if you are a meat-eater like me. Clean free-range poultry. I like to catch my own fish when I can, fresh fish. You may have a clean source of poultry like free-range eggs or chicken or good quality fish, maybe some beef or some venison or some animals that you know that are clean. These are all important things to include in your diet. Nutritional status is everything when it comes to building robust good health. Ensuring that the digestive organs are functioning optimally, the stomach, the pancreas, the small intestine, large intestine, the liver, all those organs need to function quite well. But that’s not really the topic of this video today.

We’re going to look at the immune status. The second thing I want you to look at and understand is how stress underpins immune function for many, many of my clients. They have low cortisol levels. They have adrenal fatigue. They have thyroid dysfunctions. A lot of these endocrine malfunctions come about because of our imbalanced lifestyles today. Not sleeping enough. Working too hard. Stressing too much. Deadlines. Too much time on computers, on Facebook, things like that. Most of this is really self-punishment. You can see some of my other videos on adrenal fatigue. I explain a bit more in those videos how the key hormones, when they are basically in hyper drive or they’re way insufficient, it’s going to create a huge amount of immune dysfunction with us. And this is the hidden source of immune dysfunction is chronic, low grade, unremitting stress. Nobody talks about it. Nobody does anything about it. Everyone’s concerned about diets and gluten-free this, but no one is concerned about relaxing more and chilling out more. That’s a key thing.

The third point is the toxic status. You can have the nutrients there, but as an expert told me recently, you can also have nutrient blocks. Nutrient blocks are when a nutrient is available, but for some reason, a toxin blocks this nutrient, really jams up the site. A typical one we will see would be, for example, if we look at zinc and copper in your body and you’ve also got elements of mercury or lead arsenic, or cadmium floating around in the system. This can come from smoking. It can come from past smoking. It can even come from living near a highway where you’re breathing in fumes, and those fumes could contain elements of rubber from tires because cars shed that into the air. We know that contains large amounts of cadmium.

Cadmium is a great block for zinc in the body. You’re going to block zinc. You’re going to block copper. The sites on cells that take up these metals, zinc and copper, also compete for heavy metals. Dental fillings. There are many different ways you can get heavy metals into your body. Through the food. Through the water. Through the air. Getting a regular hair analysis maybe once per annum is quite a smart move to assess what kind of heavy metal burdens you’ve got. Because you will have a heavy metal burden, we just need to determine to what degree it’s causing a problem and what imbalances are being caused by chemical levels there as well as a result of those toxins.

That’s the three core things which I think are important to talk about when it comes to immune status. That is the nutrients have to be correct and you have to be able to uptake them and excrete the waste properly. The stresses, you need to understand the relationship between stress and your immune function. Very important point is point number two. It’s completely overlooked by most practitioners I know. And the third point, of course, is the toxic status.

Most people focus on point one and three, but nobody looks at point two. In my book, Candida Crusher, I write a huge amount about that particular section, so I’d like you to check that out on or if you’ve got the time and inclination, read my book, which I think will be an eye-opener for you and for a lot of people who don’t really understand that stress and poor immune connection with Candida.

I hope that answers a few questions for you, this video, that you got some useful information out of it. Have a great day. Thank you. Bye. Bye.

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