Is hummus good for candida diet?

Is hummus any good for Candida is a question I got asked recently by a lady in Canada. Erik, can I have hummus to eat if I have a yeast infection? Yes, you can. Absolutely you can.

Let’s have a look at what hummus really is. We’re looking at chickpeas. We’re looking at tahini. We’re looking probably at a bit of – you might want to put a bit of raw garlic in there, a bit of salt, so various things like that. Hummus is actually quite okay to have when you got Candida. It’s a nice dip to have with celery sticks and carrot sticks and radishes and things like that, all these sort of yummy foods you can have on the Candida diet, so don’t refrain from eating hummus. Be careful with the commercial hummus you buy in the supermarket because it can contain a lot of unwanted ingredients in there. Best to make it yourself.

How do you make hummus? It’s pretty simple. Just get some chickpeas, get the real big plump ones, get about a cup and soak them for about five or six hours in water. That’s all I tend to do. I’ve had some friends tell me that when you’ve soaked them and they’re plump, freezing them brings out the flavor more in them. If you want to stop gas associated with hummus because some people develop bloating and gas when they got Candida, just put one drop of iodine extract in there. It could be Lugol’s solution. It could be super saturated potassium iodide, so just one drop in that water and just let it soak, the water, the chickpeas, and one drop of potassium iodide in there. Now what that does is it helps to reduce the ability of that chickpea to produce gas in your intestinal tract. Don’t ask me how it works, but apparently it works fantastic.

Once you’ve soaked these things, then you drain them. Then I tend to put them in a small cast iron pot and I simmer them. I get them boiling, then turn it down and simmer it for a little while. Let that simmer. Then I take them off, strain them of the water, I put them in my blender, mash them all up, and then I put a little bit of tahini in with it to get the right consistency. This could be maybe a third of a cup or half a cup of tahini and blend that through. With a spatula, scrape the sides, then throw in a couple of cloves of garlic, raw fresh garlic chopped and fine and throw them in, blend that all up, and that’s quite tasty, and it’s antifungal.

I’ve got a patient that sent me a recipe also regarding putting coconut oil in with it, so you may want to experiment with some coconut oil in with the hummus because coconut oil and the garlic are quite antifungal. Hummus will store in the fridge. Don’t forget. If you put hummus in the fridge, you can put a tiny little bit of coconut oil on top to stop any mold, the fungi growing on it, because I’m not keen on people having things out of the refrigerator, putting their minute out for several days or a week because molds and fungi can grow on these sort of foods. If you don’t heat them up properly, you’re contaminating your gut again.

So try all those tips and see if they work for you, and thanks for tuning in today.

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