Is Candida Spit Test Accurate? Or Is Candida Spit Test Fake?

Greetings. New Zealand naturopath, Eric Bakker. I’m the author of Candida Crusher and the formulator of the Canxida range of supplements. Thanks for checking out my video. I’ve got a question here from Edward Caper in Poland. Edward is saying, “Eric is the yeast spit test reliable? Is the spit test a reliable indication for Candida?” Let’s talk a little bit about that right now. About if it’s good, if it’s trash. Because some people online say it’s junk. Other people say it’s good.

I’ve written about the spit test in my book. The spit test is not exactly perfect or bonafide science. But what I can tell you is what I’ve found from the spit test with a lot of patients, thousands of patients I’ve seen over the years, it’s a very good general indicator of overall oral and digestive health.

You can’t say if you do the spit test and you see strings or mucous hanging there in a glass of water first thing in the morning that you’ve got a bonafide case of Candida. That’s crap. But what you can say is you’ve got problems, and those problems need addressing because healthy people don’t have that. They’ll tend to have things floating on the top of the water rather than hanging down or having particles in the bottom of the glass.

In most all cases of extremely healthy people I’ve seen, they don’t have a lot of mucous in their mouth. They don’t cough up mucous. They haven’t got mucous in their nasopharyngeal region. Mucous can be a sure sign that’s somethings wrong with your digestion. It can be an allergy. It could be a problem with your pancreas. You’re not producing enough enzymes in the mouth.

You can have gut issues. Many, many different reasons why you can have mucous. Mucous is a great breeding ground for bacteria, but it also can mean if you’ve got bacteria, that Candida may not necessarily be found behind. There’s a relationship of dysbiosis, in general, and food allergies and the spit test.

So if you’re positive for the spit test, you need to clean up your diet, improve your digestion, get the right kind of bugs into your digestive system, make sure you observe very good oral health, tongue brushing, brush your teeth twice a day. I tend to use sea salt or baking soda, but also I like using tea tree oil and look after the gums rather than the teeth. Good oral hygiene is very, very important. Because if you keep this clean, it’s going to keep stuff further down clean as well. It’s often been said that the mouth and the anus are the two dirtiest parts of the body. It’s not a good thing to say, but it’s a fact.

The spit test is not a reliable indication of Candida as such. You may have read about the different types of home tests I recommend in my book. There’s the smell test, the taste test, the itch test, these are all different kinds of tests that will give you an indication if you’ve got a yeast infection when you put them all together. No single test is good. The only test that I find is really good and accurate is a very comprehensive stool test when done properly. When done properly, it’s a very accurate indication of a yeast infection in the gut. Not necessarily systemically, but definitely in the gut. There are other ways we can pick up if you’ve got a systemic yeast infection.

Just to summarize your question, Edward. “Is the spit test a reliable indication for Candida?” No. It’s not. You’ve got to use it in conjunction with other kinds of test. But what I do like, again, just to finish up on. You can use it as a yardstick, as an indicator for improving health. So if it comes back cleaner and cleaner over a period of time, you know that you’ve taken potential allergenic food out of the diet or you’ve cleared up a potential food intolerance. You’ve reduced the amount of oral bacteria and your health is going to pick up. I hope that answers your question. Thank you.

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