How to get rid of candida cravings?

I’ve got a question here I’m going to answer today. How to stop candida cravings. I’m not sure what that question means. It may mean how do I stop sugar cravings? People with Candida often have cravings for certain kinds of food. These foods can often be sweet foods. They can be sugary foods. They can be alcohol. They can be coffee with sugar in it. It can be bagels. It can be donuts. It could be bread with peanut butter and jelly on it; jam on it. Often they crave sweet kind of foods.

Generally, it will be a carbohydrate kind of food that you’re craving. I’ve found that it generally takes about 12 weeks, about three months, to overcome a sugar craving. About 12 weeks is the norm. Here’s what you do. Here’s a clever move. In my book, I write about going “warm turkey” not “cold turkey.” You know what “cold turkey” means. You’ve just got to stop something entirely. I think it’s a dumb idea. You don’t just stop things in people’s diets because they usually revert back to what they were doing, so you slow people down. This is what I tend to do.

Let’s say, for example, now you are having three coffees a day and a glass of wine at night. I’d probably cut you back to two coffees a day, initially, for the first week and then eventually the one coffee a day. I keep patients on one coffee. I don’t believe that taking coffee away from people entirely is a good thing. Same with alcohol. Whatever you’re drinking now, you cut that by 50 percent for the first two weeks, and then we make some small reductions over time.

Remember what I said? It takes three months to overcome the craving. If we just go cold turkey, how long do you think it’s going to be before you have a cookie again or something sweet? You’re probably going to have it within two weeks, so it’s not a good idea because then you set up this guilt thing where you’ve had that cookie and you think, “Oh, my god. I feel so bad. I’ve had this cookie. I was stupid. I should have been avoiding these foods.” Don’t do that to yourself. Don’t stop everything cold turkey.

The first thing you phase out is the obvious crap from the diet, you know, like soda drinks, putting sugar in foods, these are the things that you cut right back and eventually phase out. And then the second thing you eventually phase out are things like sauces and condiments with lots of sugars in them. Stopping takeaway food. Takeaway food you should have stopped ages ago, anyway. I mean these are just crappy sort of foods that you shouldn’t be eating at all.

Eventually, you’re going to get to a point where you can start looking more carefully at sugars in your diet in terms of fruit. Fruit is not the first thing you chop out of your diet when you’re trying to cut sugar out. Fruit is one of the last things you cut out when you’re going into the MEVI diet or the Candida diet. Fruit sugars are still sugar, but they’re not as bad as having sugar inside Coca-Cola, which is a different kind of sugar. But eventually, we’re going to cut the sugar in fruits out as well, and the fruits I like people to have with Candida usually are green apples, blueberries, kiwi is usually okay, one kiwi a day, pomegranates, you know, there are different fruits that you can eat.

This is a good way for you to slowly cut sugar out of your diet. Then you’ll get to a point where the brain doesn’t have that strong pull on you anymore to keep wanting to have sugar every two or three hours. If you do it intelligently and wisely and slowly over a period of probably about a month, you won’t have the withdrawal of the cravings for sugar. You’re going to lose a ton of weight in time and you’re not going to feed the Candida up and that’s a really good thing.

Check out my articles on yeastinfection.org. If you want to know a lot more, buy my book, Candida Crusher because it’s all in there.

Thanks for tuning in.

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