How can I know if I am recovering from candida?

Thank you for checking out this video today. Here’s a question I get asked from time to time. What are the signs that I’m recovering from a Candida infection? How do I know if I’m getting better? How do I know? Any clue?

Well, you have a think about it. There are many different signs and symptoms that will show you or more likely disappearance of symptoms that will show you that you’re actually getting well. What I want you to try to think about is how long you’ve had the condition for. What kind of treatments you’ve used to try to get well, and particularly, what were the most annoying symptoms that were bothering you with Candida? Have a think about that.

One of the best ways to know if you’re going to get well is to track your symptoms, so once you start treatment is to actually use a kind of a symptom tracker. You can make this yourself or you can use the one out of Candida Crusher. Symptoms are ideally tracked over a 12 week or 3-month period, particularly when you’ve got a chronic condition with multiple symptoms because it’s really hard for you to work out what’s got better, what’s got worse.

Patients often see me and say, “I don’t feel any better at all. I’m feeling just as bad as I did when I came to see you several months ago. This is all a waste of time. I’ve wasted my money and I’ve blown thousands of dollars on all sorts of treatments and it looks like your treatment is just another one of these scam treatments.” Look, I can tell you, I’ve heard it all before. I’ve seen many, many people over the years. Some give me good feedback. Some give me amazing feedback. Some give me not so good feedback. Some give me terrible feedback.

The interesting thing that I find is I just grabbed their case taking form, so I’ll have a look at the patient’s case taking form. I write all the things down, particularly when the patient first sees me. I’ll ask the patient questions every time they see me. A typical thing I will do when someone is seeing me with a lot of chronic problems and they give me 100 symptoms or whatever is I ask them “What are the three key things that really bug you? If you could get rid of these three key problems, what would they be right now in no particular order?” Most people say, “Oh, that’s easy. Poor energy. Bad bowel problem.

Terrible sleep.” They’ll give me three particular things, and then I will say to them “Now you’ve given me three key symptoms. Now what we’re going to do is grade each of these symptoms from 1 to 3; 1 being mild, 2 being moderate, 3 being severe.” And then someone could say, for example, like “Well, the bowel problem is number three; that’s like real bad. That’s got to go. It’s got to go straightaway.” And they’ll say something then like “Insomnia, yeah, it’s not so bad. I would say one, maybe two.” And then I would say, “Is it mild or is it moderate?” “Well, it’s actually moderate,” so then that will be a two and the energy may be a one or a two as well.

I’ve been treating this patient for some time and then I’ll ask them again maybe on the second or third follow up visit I’ll say, “What are the three key things that are bugging you?” And I won’t tell them what they told me a while back, and they may say other things or they may come back to the same things. And then I’ll ask them again. “Tell me about the bowel problem.” “Well, actually that’s a one.” And then I’ll write down one. Once they’ve given me those symptoms, I’ll say to them “Hang on a minute. A while ago you told me it was a three.” “Well, actually you’re right. The bowel problem is not as bad as it used to be.” But then when they came back on that visit, they would’ve said, “Oh, the bowel problem is just as bad as it always was.

The thing is when we live with symptoms for a long time, we tend to get used to them. And when they slowly disappear, sometimes we still think they’re bugging us. So the only way you’re going to work out if you’re getting well is to track your symptoms over a long period of time by using a symptom tracker of some degree. Or ask other people around you, friends or family, to keep an eye on you and to check in with you regularly to tell you if they feel that you’re improving. Because I’ll tell you this, when you’re improving physically, you’re improving emotionally and mentally as well because that’s how the body works. We don’t just get rid of symptoms on a physical basis. When we feel good inside, we also start feeling good emotionally. We respond better to people. We’re not as irritable. We’re not as depressed. We don’t come across as tired and disinterested. Our sex life improves. Some of us may feel romantic all of a sudden again or we may want to go on vacation and enjoy time with friends or family.

When you improve, you’re going to feel better in yourself. That’s a key thing. The desire to live a long happy life starts improving, and it shows on you. You’ll start smiling more. You won’t be as sullen and as irritable and as cranky maybe as you were. Because people who have got poor digestive health, poor urinary health, or poor immune health, health on multiple levels, poor hormonal health, they’re going to express this on multiple levels and people around them will pick this up.

You’ll be surprised how other people pick up these things even more so than you. So be sure to ask people around you to keep an eye on you. You’ll certainly know when you’re getting well from Candida. It’ll be a slow, but steady increase in health on many different levels, physical levels, emotional levels, and mental levels.

You can read plenty more if you go to and don’t forget to do my online yeast infection quiz. It’s the best one in the world by a long shot. It’s taken me a long time to perfect this quiz. Go to or go to and check for the button, click through to the quiz. That will tell you if you’re mild, moderate or severe. It will give you a pretty good idea.

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