Candida Question #31 Is Candida Yeast Infection Common in Toddlers?

It certainly is and it’s something that I do see regularly. I saw more yeast infections in toddlers when I lived in Australia in a warmer client than I do in New Zealand.

There are a couple of contributing factors to yeast infections in infants and particular toddlers. And one of them is diapers or nappies. You need to be quite careful using nappies with children. Using the cotton nappies often will mean you’re going to use a plastic cover for this diaper, and if you don’t change frequently, you can get more skin irritation and also a lot more warmth or heat generation which can predispose toward yeast infection.

Remember that yeast likes warm, dark, moist areas and skin folds of a baby’s legs and thighs and groin area can be a perfect breeding ground for Candida albicans. Often your doctor can do a skin scraping and determine whether the child has a Candida infection or not.

So some good preventative measures for you would be to change the diapers more frequently, perhaps use some calendula cream which is anti-fungal, allow the child to run around and be exposed to air, light and some sunshine, and to be quite cautious with cotton diapers. Even though I’m not a big fan of disposables, I think, if a child does have a yeast problem or a skin rash, I would recommend you switch to disposable diapers and use them more frequently, and you’ll soon get on top of the infection.

Also be careful of what the child has to eat or drink because this can obviously cause a problem. And I’ve also seen cases of the mother taking an antibiotic. If she’s breastfeeding, the child will get a good dose of the antibiotics, which can help to bring on a yeast infection as well.

So these are all factors that you need to take into account with a toddler and a yeast infection. So I hope that answers your question.

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