Can Vitamin C Help Against Candida?

Greetings. New Zealand naturopath, Eric Bakker, author of Candida Crusher. I have a question here from a lady called Teresa Neal in Oklahoma in America. I’m not sure if it’s on the east coast or the west coast. I’ve heard it’s a very beautiful place.

Teresa is asking me a question today, “Eric, is vitamin C good for Candida?” Teresa, vitamin C is excellent, not just for Candida, but excellent for the body in general. I’ll give you a bit of an explanation why it’s so darn good.

First we have to understand we’ve probably been told for a long, long time that vitamin C is one of the best things we can take to counter the common cold or to boost your immune function. But why does this occur? Why is it such a potent vitamin to take? Why are doctors so dismissive of it and think it’s a load of nonsense?

Well, a good friend of mine, Dr. James Wilson taught me a lot about vitamin C. Dr. Wilson, of course, is the person who came up with the phrase “adrenal fatigue,” and Dr. Wilson said that the highest concentration in the body of vitamin C, there are two places, the adrenal cortex or the part of the adrenal gland that makes cortisol, and the lens of the eye. When you think about it. If the body puts vitamin C in a particular organ or tissue, it will do so for a very specific reason.

Vitamin C is in the adrenal cortex so it can help to produce cortisol. Cortisol is probably the most important hormone when it comes to boosting your immune function. It boosts multiple aspects of immune function. All the cells of the body contain receptor sites for cortisol, but the white blood cells contain hundreds of times more receptor sites than any other cell. The only cells that don’t contain sites for being activated by cortisol are hair and nails, because they’re dead tissue. But all other cells contain areas where cortisol activate them. But the white cells, in particular, have a very powerful affinity for cortisol, and cortisol can’t be manufactured without adequate levels of vitamin C in the body. Now you understand why vitamin C helps people with the common cold and the flu and cancer and many different immune problems.

Dr. Linus Pauling and Dr. Matthias Rath are two doctors who did most of the early work on vitamin C. Pauling, I think got two Nobel Prizes in his day. Very clever man. Pauling worked out that the average person needs right about 3000 to 4000 milligrams of vitamin C per day. Check out Dr. Pauling’s YouTube video on vitamins creating expensive urine. It’s a very good video and it will make you laugh when he was asked about vitamin C, if it was any good for the body.

Coming back to Candida. Vitamin C is exceptionally good for Candida, but I think along with many other different vitamins and minerals. You shouldn’t just take it on its own in exclusion from anything else. It forms a very important part of the diet. If you’re eating a lot of good vegetables, things like spinach and good green vegetables all the time, you’re going to be getting plenty of vitamin C. But if you want over and above, it pays to supplement.

The product I’m going to make very soon, which I’ve formulated already. I’m just waiting to find the right person to make it for me is called Canxida Rebuild and it contains plenty of vitamin C. Vitamin C must always be buffered. Meaning if you’re going to take straight ascorbic acid as a source of vitamin C, it could create a lot of heartburn and reflux and digestive problems, so you want to make sure that you’ve got some calcium/magnesium there to buffer it a little bit in the right form and also that you take it with something called bioflavonoids. Bioflavonoids are vitamin C like compounds. Anywhere in nature you find vitamin C, you’ll find a bioflavonoid. And the main ones are rutin, quercetin, and hesperidin. Bioflavonoids are very protective kind of vitamins. Plants have them along with the vitamin C to stop them from insect attack and to improve microcirculation. That’s what they do in our body as well.

Vitamin C also has a good effect on improving our gut function. It actually helps to boost production of stomach acid. It also increases the way that our body circulates blood and lymph fluid. It has a very good effect on helping to build various neurotransmitters or hormones in the body. It helps to stabilize blood pressure. It improves kidney and liver function. There are multiple effects. We could spend a whole hour just talking about the different health benefits of vitamin C. You can’t build good bone tissue without vitamin C, for example. It’s exceedingly important.

How much is enough? It all depends on what you’re trying to achieve with vitamin C, but I’m quite happy with people taking a minimum of 500 milligrams to 1000 milligrams per day. That’s usually a good dose in a supplement. But if you’re eating plenty of vegetables, you’ll be getting adequate amounts in. Fruits containing vitamin C you need to be careful of in the early stages of the Candida diet. But as time goes on, you can increase the amount of fruits you eat. Kiwi fruit are very high in vitamin C, and I don’t find them a problem with most people with a yeast infection. One kiwi fruit per day for many patients now I find has no real concern.

That’s my take on vitamin C, Teresa, it’s fantastic for yeast infection. It works very well. Take it as a multi-vitamin. You can take a bit on its own, but make sure that bioflavonoids are there with it and drink plenty of water. The other fallacy or bit of nonsense about vitamin C you will here is it creates kidney stones. There is no proof at all that vitamin C creates kidney stones. Intravenous is what I recommend for cancer patients up to 20,000 or 30,000 milligrams per day intravenously works very well for many people. I’ve got incredibly good cases I could mention regarding very sick people who recovered literally within a week with IV vitamin C. So I’m a huge fan of vitamin C myself.

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